Indiana Family Aided By Fertility Grant Available To Others

Cade Foundation Offers Up To $10,000 To Recipients

Many couples who desperately want to be parents find themselves in an emotionally grueling struggle, but an Indiana family wants others to know that financial help is available.

Infertility issues affect more than 6 million people in the U.S. -- about one in seven couples, 6News' Tanya Spencer reported.

The Tinina Cade Foundation, a first of its kind organization dedicated to helping with the financial struggle of conceiving, helped Nick and Stacie Vetor.

From the time they got together, the Vetors knew they wanted a big family.

"It was something we never doubted we would do, that we would always be parents," Stacie Vetor said.

A medical condition initially kept them from realizing that dream, but surgery allowed them to conceive Ryan, who is now 2 and a half.

A miscarriage a year ago had ended all hope that Stacie could get pregnant again naturally. Doctors suggested in-vitro fertilization.

"I don't want to say financial burden, but it's very costly," Stacie Vetor said.

The average cost in the U.S. for all the medications and a single in-vitro cycle is about $15,000, and the success rate is only 30 percent.

"We just weren't sure how we were going to come up with that money," Stacie Vetor said.

Then, she stumbled across the Cade Foundation Web site. The organization was founded by a woman in Maryland who had struggled with infertility for years until her mother served as her surrogate. The woman started a grant in her mother's honor.

Nine couples have received the grant so far. The Vetors are the first from Indiana.

"We just didn't even know something like that even existed," Stacie Vetor said.

The Vetors are telling their story to ensure other Hoosier couples know about the resource, and they're organizing their own fundraiser in Indiana to help the nonprofit foundation grow.

"It'll be exciting to give the opportunity to future families to have this same blessing," said Nick Vetor.

Stacie will go through in-vitro in February and hope to know by mid-March if Ryan will have a baby brother or sister this year.

"We were just so excited that maybe growing our family is something that could actually happen now," Stacie Vetor said.

Families can get up to $10,000 each through the grant. The money can be used for either fertility treatments or domestic adoption.

More Info: Tinina Cade Foundation