2 men in Lauren Spierer case oppose parents' request to judge to exclude private information

INDIANAPOLIS - Two men being sued by the parents of an Indiana University student who disappeared after a late-night party are opposing her parents' request that a federal judge exclude "sensitive and private information" from the case.

Attorneys for Corey Rossman and Jason Rosenbaum say in court documents that the parents of Lauren Spierer weren't specific enough about what types of "private" information they want the court to keep out of the case.

"Plaintiffs fail to identify any specific types of information the disclosure of which would jeopardize ongoing investigations or articulate how the disclosure of this information would affect those investigations," attorney John C. Trimble wrote in documents filed Tuesday in federal court in Indianapolis.

Spierer, a 20-year-old Greenburgh, N.Y., native, disappeared in June 2011 after a night of partying with friends in Bloomington. Her parents, Robert and Mary Charlene Spierer, claim in their lawsuit that Rossman and Rosenbaum gave her alcohol and didn't make sure she returned safely to her apartment, leading to her presumed death.

No criminal charges have ever been filed in the woman's disappearance, and the case remains open.

The Spierers filed a request on Jan. 29 asking Judge Tanya Walton Pratt to issue an order "preventing public dissemination of sensitive and private information" that may be filed in court and saying it might interfere with the police investigation and make seating an impartial jury difficult.

But attorneys for Rossman and Rosenbaum say in court documents that asserting that sensitive evidence "could" impede the investigation wasn't good enough to meet the legal standard. The Spierers have to prove that the "private" information actually would interfere with the process, they said.

The family's attorney, Jason Ross Barclay, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he regarded the protective order as routine and a minor issue in the case. More important, he said, was that Magistrate Judge Tim Baker had ordered both sides to begin the routine process of turning over evidence to each other so that no secrets are kept.

Rosenbaum and Rossman had previously tried to delay that process, saying some of the information disclosed might tend to incriminate them, but Baker on Jan. 31 said the men hadn't proven that would happen and he ordered the process to proceed.

Baker said the process needs to move on, even though it may not answer all the questions about Lauren Spierer's disappearance.

Attorneys representing the men declined additional comment.

Print this article Back to Top