Sampson Agrees To Resign, Take $750K

Some IU Players Skip First Practice Under Dakich

Indiana University will pay basketball coach Kelvin Sampson $750,000 for his immediate resignation amid allegations he committed major NCAA rule violations, and assistant coach Dan Dakich will be the team's interim head coach, the school said Friday night.

The deal, which includes a provision that prevents Sampson (pictured) from suing the university for damages, was expected to be signed Friday night, IU spokesman Larry MacIntyre said.

Some IU players threatened to sit out Saturday's game against Northwestern in protest, and six skipped a Friday afternoon practice led by Dakich. However, IU athletic director Rick Greenspan said he believed "most or all of the players" were at a Friday evening team walkthrough.

Greenspan said he felt "significant disappointment" for the players because they had developed a bond with Sampson and because the resignation disrupts their season. He said he assumed "there's always that chance" of a player boycott, but he believed the players would participate in the Northwestern game.

"It's my expectation that as they heal emotionally and as they refamiliarize themselves with the coaching staff in slightly different roles, they'll perform at a high level," Greenspan said.

Senior captain D.J. White, Armon Bassett, Jordan Crawford, Jamarcus Ellis, DeAndre Thomas and Brandon McGee missed the afternoon practice. The Hoosiers (22-4 overall; 11-2 in the Big Ten) are scheduled to fly to the Chicago area Saturday morning for the Northwestern game.

McCallum Named Assistant Head Coach; Sampson Wishes Players 'The Best'

Greenspan said another of Sampson's assistants, former Ball State and Houston head coach Ray McCallum, will serve as assistant head coach. Assistant coach Jeff Meyer, whom the NCAA alleged committed recruiting rules violations along with Sampson, will remain as assistant, Greenspan said.

Rick Greenspan

A Feb. 8 NCAA report alleged Sampson and two assistants didn't comply with telephone recruiting restrictions that had been imposed because of Sampson's previous violations at Oklahoma. It also accused Sampson of providing misleading information to investigators from the university and the NCAA.

In a statement released Friday night, Sampson said he wished IU's players "nothing but the best for the remainder of the season."

"While I'm saddened that I will not have the opportunity to continue to coach these athletes, I feel that it's in the best interest of the program for me to step aside at this time," Sampson said.

Before the buyout, Sampson had been scheduled to make an annual base salary of $500,000. Five years were left on the contract he signed in April 2006; it included termination clauses for violations of university or NCAA rules.

An anonymous donor contributed $550,000 to Sampson's buyout, officials said.

The school's president on Feb. 15 gave Greenspan a week to investigate the NCAA's allegations and recommend what should happen next.

IU self-reported some of the alleged violations last year, saying they were minor, and imposed its own sanctions on Sampson -- making him forfeit a $500,000 pay raise and one scholarship next season. Assistant coach Rob Senderoff also was punished by forfeiting any bonuses or salary increases for one year and later resigned.

But the NCAA alleged the violations were major, and such violations can carry punishments including postseason ineligibility.

Dan Dakich has been named IU's interim head coach.

The NCAA has asked IU to reply to the allegations in writing by May 8 and to send officials to a June 14 hearing by the Division I Committee on Infractions. Greenspan said Sampson would be permitted to attend the June 14 hearing.

Sampson has said he never intentionally provided false or misleading information to NCAA investigators. In his statement Friday, he said: "I welcome the opportunity to go before the Committee on Infractions in June. I look forward to getting back on the basketball court in the very near future."

Dakich, who played at IU for Bob Knight from 1982 to 1985, was Knight's assistant from 1985 to 1997 before serving as head coach at Bowling Green State University for 10 years. Sampson hired him as IU's director of basketball operation in June, and Dakich became an assistant coach on Oct. 31 when assistant Rob Senderoff resigned.

"I want nothing but the best for these players and the institution," Dakich said in a statement Friday. "The challenge ahead is to maintain the positive momentum that has been built within the team and to keep everyone as focused as possible during this difficult time."

Details Of Allegations

The allegations in the NCAA report are:

  • That Sampson, assistant coach Rob Senderoff and assistant coach Jeff Meyer failed to comply with sanctions imposed on Sampson for impermissible recruiting calls he made while he was a coach at Oklahoma -- sanctions that followed him to IU when he took the job in 2006. Sampson and Senderoff are alleged to have jointly participated in telephone calls at a time when Sampson was prohibited from being present or taking part when staff members made recruiting calls. Senderoff and Meyer are alleged to have made about 100 calls that exceeded the sanction limits. Senderoff resigned his position Oct. 30.
  • That Senderoff and Meyer placed at least 25 telephone calls to nine potential recruits that exceeded NCAA limits even if no sanctions had been in place.
  • That Sampson acted contrary to the NCAA principles of ethical conduct when he knowingly violated recruiting restrictions imposed by the NCAA Committee on Infractions, and that he failed to deport himself in accordance with the generally recognized high standard of honesty normally associated with the conduct and administration of intercollegiate athletics by providing the institution and the NCAA enforcement staff false or misleading information, and that he failed to promote an atmosphere for compliance within the men's basketball program and failed to monitor the activities regarding compliance of one or more of his assistant coaches.
  • That Senderoff acted contrary to the NCAA principles of ethical conduct when he knowingly violated recruiting restrictions imposed by the NCAA Committee on Infractions, and that he failed to deport himself in accordance with the generally recognized high standard of honesty normally associated with the conduct and administration of intercollegiate athletics by providing the institution false or misleading information.
  • That Sampson and Meyer engaged in an impermissible recruiting contact during a two-day sports camp held at Assembly Hall on June 30 and July 1, 2007, and that Meyer provided the potential recruit with an impermissible benefit -- at least one T-shirt and drawstring backpack.