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BBB warns of social media clickbait following Vegas shooting

Posted: 8:31 PM, Oct 05, 2017
Updated: 2017-10-05 20:31:57-04
BBB warns of online scams after Vegas shooting
BBB warns of online scams after Vegas shooting

INDIANAPOLIS -- The Better Business Bureau has a warning out to beware of scammers and clickbait following the Las Vegas shootings.

 

The BBB anticipates a wave of clickbait ads on social media claiming to have exclusive information, pictures or videos involving the Las Vegas mass shooting.

 

They can contain viruses, malware or other means to get to your personal information.

 

“Scammers take advantage of events like this by posting interesting or salacious material on social media that trick people into “clicking” on these dangerous links” said Tim Maniscalo, President of Better Business Bureau Serving Central Indiana.

 

BBB suggests:

  • Not clicking on links the use words like “exclusive” or “shocking”.
  • Hovering over the link to see its true destination is a trustworthy site.
  • Immediately changing your password should you suspect your account has been compromised.
  • Report suspicious posts to Facebook.
  • Filing a report on BBB’s Scamtracker if you feel you have been scammed.

Scammers may try to reach you via phone or email to get you to donate money.

 

The Federal Trade Commission says you should avoid any charity or fundraise that does the following:

 

  • Refuses to provide detailed information about its identity, mission, costs, and how the donation will be used.
  • Won't provide proof that a contribution is tax deductible.
  • Uses a name that closely resembles that of a better-known, reputable organization.
  • Thanks you for a pledge you don’t remember making.
  • Uses high-pressure tactics like trying to get you to donate immediately, without giving you time to think about it and do your research.
  • Asks for donations in cash or asks you to wire money.
  • Offers to send a courier or overnight delivery service to collect the donation immediately.
  • Guarantees sweepstakes winnings in exchange for a contribution. By law, you never have to give a donation to be eligible to win sweepstakes.

The FTC says you can also take the following precautions to make sure your donation benefits the people and organizations you want to help.

  • Ask for detailed information about the charity, including name, address, and telephone number.
  • Get the exact name of the organization and do some research. Searching the name of the organization online — especially with the word “complaint(s)” or “scam”— is one way to learn about its reputation.
  • Call the charity. Find out if the organization is aware of the solicitation and has authorized the use of its name. The organization’s development staff should be able to help you.
  • Find out if the charity or fundraiser must be registered in your state by contacting the  National Association of State Charity Officials.
  • Check if the charity is trustworthy by contacting the  Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) Wise Giving Alliance Charity Navigator Charity Watch , or  GuideStar .
  • Ask if the caller is a paid fundraiser. If so, ask:
    • The name of the charity they represent
    • The percentage of your donation that will go to the charity
    • How much will go to the actual cause to which you’re donating
    • How much will go to the fundraiser
  • Keep a record of your donations.
  • Make an annual donation plan. That way, you can decide which causes to support and which reputable charities should receive your donations.
  • Visit this  Internal Revenue Service (IRS) webpage  to find out which organizations are eligible to receive tax deductible contributions.
  • Know the difference between “tax exempt” and “tax deductible.” Tax exempt means the organization doesn’t have to pay taxes. Tax deductible means you can deduct your contribution on your federal income tax return.
  • Never send cash donations. For security and tax purposes, it’s best to pay by check — made payable to the charity — or by credit card.
  • Never wire money to someone claiming to be a charity. Scammers often request donations to be wired because wiring money is like sending cash: once you send it, you can’t get it back.
  • Do not provide your credit or check card number, bank account number or any personal information until you’ve thoroughly researched the charity.
  • Be wary of charities that spring up too suddenly in response to current events and natural disasters. Even if they are legitimate, they probably don’t have the infrastructure to get the donations to the affected area or people.
  • If a donation request comes from a group claiming to help your local community (for example, local police or firefighters), ask the local agency if they have heard of the group and are getting financial support.
  • What about texting? If you text to donate, the charge will show up on your mobile phone bill. If you've asked your mobile phone provider to block premium text messages — texts that cost extra — then you won't be able to donate this way.

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