23 states showing widespread flu outbreaks

Influenza is on the rise across the country, according to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report

Haven't gotten the flu shot yet? This map should give you a good reason:

The number of states reporting widespread flu activity jumped from 12 to 23, the proportion of samples testing positive for influenza at clinical laboratories went from 8.4% to 14.0%, and the percentage of people seeking outpatient care for influenza-like illness (ILI) increased from 2.7% to 3.5% over last week’s report, according to the CDC.

The CDC says that the best bet for fighting the flu is to get a flu shot. Check with your physician or your county health department.

According to the CDC's definition, influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.
    * It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

Widespread influenza activity was reported by 23 states:

  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • South Carolina
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Wisconsin

Regional influenza activity was reported by Puerto Rico and 23 states:

  • Alaska
  • Colorado
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Maine
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • Wyoming

Local influenza activity was reported by the District of Columbia and four states:

  • Delaware
  • Hawaii
  • Utah
  • West Virginia

Sporadic activity was reported by the U.S. Virgin Islands. Guam did not report. Geographic spread data show how many areas within a state or territory are seeing flu activity.

Print this article Back to Top