Drug trafficking business at Franklin home busted after neighbors call police with concerns

FRANKLIN, Ind. -- Five people, including a juvenile, were arrested this week, accused of operating a drug trafficking business inside a Franklin home.

The drug ring was busted up by concerned neighbors, who made calls to the Franklin Police Department over the course of several weeks, alerting them to suspicious activity after new residents moved in to rent the home a few months ago.

The first complaint came on February 12 about "drug dealing" going on at 4002 Tamara Way in Franklin, according to Franklin police. 

The same citizen called back on February 24, 26 and 27, noting "a lot of late night traffic going to the house" and more suspected drug dealing.

A second tipster called on February 19, also wanting to discuss multiple suspects dealing drugs and guns in Franklin. 

On March 6, police acquired a search warrant for the address. After announcing their presence loudly and knocking multiple times, police prepped to ram the door. As an officer was swinging the ram for the first time, a shirtless male opened the door. The ram grazed the front door, causing a dent.

The man who opened the door is identified as Tyler A. Coffey. He was arrested.

Police also found a juvenile and a woman, Autumn G. Greaves in a room that they said was "smoky." Officers arrested the two of them.

Police say they then found Isaiah M. Adair in the bathroom of the home attempting to flush bags of marijuana down the toilet. While he was being arrested, he informed officers of a handgun in the waistband of his lower back. The firearm was secured. 

Police found several bags of suspected marijuana during a search of the house, weighing at least 111 grams. They also seized drug paraphernalia and at least $900 in cash suspected to be as a result of drug deals. 

Police searched the downstairs bedroom, which was said to belong to the mother and head of household, Kristain Figg. Figg was not home at the time of the warrant, but she was eventually taken into custody.

Franklin police said this is a great example of "see something, say something" working out to make the community safer.

One neighbor said they began to notice the activity as suspicious when a lot of high school-aged kids would show up at the house. They said after school was out, they would line the streets in their cars, go in to the house for five or 10 minutes, and then come back out.

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