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Indianapolis files for eminent domain to acquire condemned Oaktree Apartments

City can purchase beleaguered Oaktree Apartments, council rules
Posted at 12:59 PM, May 17, 2019
and last updated 2019-05-17 21:43:42-04

INDIANAPOLIS — The City of Indianapolis has filed suit to acquire a crime-ridden apartment complex on the northeast side through eminent domain.

The Indianapolis Department of Metropolitan Development filed suit Friday to acquire the Oaktree Apartment, located near the intersection of 42nd Street and Post Road.

The complex was condemned by the Marion County Health Department in February 2014.

The location has been a “magnet for crime, vandalism, and fire, and a drain on city and county resources,” a release from the city states.

"Unfortunately, this is just a situation where the property owners are just unwilling to make any improvements and these 28 buildings are a terrible blight to the far east side," Indianapolis Department of Metropolitan Development Director Emily Mack said. "This is an opportunity to improve the quality of life and to remove those public safety and health nuisances."

The city has been in a battle with the property owner, Indy Diamond LLC, for years.

In July 2018, a Marion County court ordered the company to obtain wrecking permits and demolish the complex by Aug. 30. No permit applications were submitted, and Indy Diamond has been in contempt of court.

Last month, the city sent an acquisition offer to Indy Diamond -- an offer to buy the property without eminent domain. Indy Diamond's attorney reached out to the city, but wasn't responsive when the city returned the message, Mack said.

MORE OAKTREE COVERAGE | Judge orders demolition of troubled Oaktree Apartments on Indy's far eastside | City can purchase beleaguered Oaktree Apartments, council rules | Demolition ordered for Far Eastside's troubled Oaktree Apartments | For one Indy councilor, the Oaktree Apartments problem is personal | Oaktree Apartments to be demolished by City of Indianapolis

Indianapolis has requested the court order three people to appraise the value of the complex for eminent domain. The city wants to demolish the apartment complex and redevelop the site.